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EGU Autumn 2018 elections: call for candidates

  • EGU news
  • 17 July 2018

The EGU Election Autumn 2018 for the next EGU Treasurer will take place from 1 to 30 November 2018. You are kindly asked to propose a candidate for the vacancy by 15 September 2018. You are welcome and encouraged to nominate yourself.



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EGU 2019 call for sessions

  • EGU news
  • 25 June 2018

The call for session proposals for the EGU 2019 General Assembly is now open. Until 6 September you can suggest new sessions with conveners and description, or you can propose modifications to current ones. Please note that, similarly to last year, the 6 September deadline also applies to short courses and townhall meetings. The deadline to submit proposals for Union Symposia and Great Debates is 15 August. The next EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria on 7–12 April 2019.


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Follow EU policy news on the EGU website

  • EGU news
  • 22 June 2018

A new section on the EGU policy pages summarises recent EU policy news and opportunities that are relevant to geoscientists. It includes recently passed legislation, EU funding opportunities and EU Commission consultations.



Highlight articles

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Mineralogy and physicochemical features of Saharan dust wet deposited in the Iberian Peninsula during an extreme red rain event

Saharan dust wet deposited in Granada (Spain) on 21–23 February 2017 during the most extreme red rain event of the last decades led to the deposition of ~ 140 000 T of dust just in the city of Granada, dwarfing any other standard Saharan dust events taking place in the area. The multianalytical study of Saharan dust disclosed potential source areas and the mineralogy and composition of the size fractions of desert dust as well as its potential biogeochemical, radiative, and health effects.


Annales Geophysicae

Ionospheric and thermospheric response to the 27–28 February 2014 geomagnetic storm over north Africa

The novelty of this paper lies in the fact that it addresses the thermosphere–ionosphere coupling in a midlatitude site in north Africa. We have used Fabry–Perot measurements of thermospheric winds and wide-angle camera detection of ionospheric structures at an altitude of about 250 km. We have also used GPS data to extract the TEC over the studied area. We have focused our study on the 27 February geomagnetic storm.



Ocean Science

On the role of the North Equatorial Counter Current during a strong El Niño

Results from a high-resolution ocean model show that during the strong El Niños of 1983 and 1998, transport of warm water in the equatorial Pacific was dominated by the North Equatorial Counter Current and not by equatorial Kelvin waves. The results show why the NECC fails to do this in most years and how stronger than normal annual Rossby waves near the Equator can both trigger the El Niño in the western Pacific and help to ensure that the warm water arrives off South America around Christmas.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

How deep does groundwater go? Mining (dark) data from the depths

How deep does groundwater go? Mining (dark) data from the depths

Post by Kevin Befus, Assistant Professor at the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Wyoming, in the United States. __________________________________________________ We’ve all been asked (or do the asking), “where does your water come from?” This is a fundamental question for establishing a series of additional questions that can ultimately help define strategies for valuing and protecting a particular water resource. For groundwater, we could phrase this question differently, and I often do when talking to well …


NASA’s Juno mission reveals Jupiter’s magnetic field greatly differs from Earth’s

NASA’s Juno mission reveals Jupiter’s magnetic field greatly differs from Earth’s

NASA scientists have revealed surprising new information about Jupiter’s magnetic field from data gathered by their space probe, Juno. Unlike earth’s magnetic field, which is symmetrical in the North and South Poles, Jupiter’s magnetic field has startlingly different magnetic signatures at the two poles. The information has been collected as part of the Juno program, NASA’s latest mission to unravel the mysteries of the biggest planet in our solar system. The solar-powered spacecraft is made of three 8.5 metre-long solar …


The rock whisperers...

The rock whisperers...

The Geodynamics 101 series serves to showcase the diversity of research topics and methods in the geodynamics community in an understandable manner. We welcome all researchers – PhD students to professors – to introduce their area of expertise in a lighthearted, entertaining manner and touch upon some of the outstanding questions and problems related to their fields. This month, Manar Alsaif, PhD student at Université Montpellier, discusses actual rocks and field work! In a discipline increasingly shaped by models, what …