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European Geosciences Union

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future
cl.egu.eu

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

President: Didier Roche (cl@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Marc Luetscher (marc.luetscher@isska.ch)

The Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future is one of the larger divisions of the European Geosciences Union. It pools from many disciplines and consequently has many co-organized and co-listed sessions with other divisions at the general assembly. The division is very interdisciplinary and covers climate variations on all time scales. CL includes the study of any kind of climate archive from rocks to ocean cores, speleothems, ice cores, chronicles, to instrumental records to name a few. Besides observations, climate modeling on all time scales from the deep past to the future are areas covered by the division. Any aspect of the climate system falls into the realm of the division e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and geology. Themes focus on the climate on Earth but may also expand other planets or the sun.

Recent awardees

David A. Hodell

David A. Hodell

  • 2018
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2018 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to David A. Hodell for fundamental contributions to reconstructing and understanding past climate cycles and the causes of the mid-Pleistocene transition.


Hubertus Fischer

Hubertus Fischer

  • 2018
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2018 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Hubertus Fischer for his innovative development and use of analytical techniques to measure chemical compounds and gas concentrations and their isotopic compositions in polar ice cores.


Christo Buizert

Christo Buizert

  • 2018
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2018 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Christo Buizert for his innovative contributions on the bi-polar phasing of climate change from polar ice-core data using an exceptional combination of experimental and theoretical approaches.


Annarosa Quarello

Annarosa Quarello

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Annarosa Quarello Homogenization of GNSS-derived IWV time series


Davide Panosetti

Davide Panosetti

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Davide Panosetti Convergence behavior of convection-resolving simulations of summertime deep convection over land


D. Jimena Roncancio Benitez

D. Jimena Roncancio Benitez

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to D. Jimena Roncancio Benitez Evaluation of climate variability and temperature extremes in Colombia: Opportunities for the outlining of climate change and human health adaptive strategies.


Erwin Rottler

Erwin Rottler

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Erwin Rottler Alpine temperature changes: features and feedbacks


Nele-Charlotte Neddermann

Nele-Charlotte Neddermann

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Nele-Charlotte Neddermann Seasonal predictability of European summer climate re-assessed


Axel Timmermann

Axel Timmermann

  • 2017
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2017 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Axel Timmermann for fundamental and pioneering contributions to the understanding of climate dynamics at different spatial and temporal scales.


Denis-Didier Rousseau

Denis-Didier Rousseau

  • 2017
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2017 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Denis-Didier Rousseau in recognition of his pioneering work in continental climate reconstruction by developing new proxies and combining them with innovative climate-model simulations.


Francesco Muschitiello

Francesco Muschitiello

  • 2017
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2017 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Francesco Muschitiello for his contributions to understanding mechanisms of abrupt climatic change in combination with observations across the North Atlantic region.


Annette Bösmeier

Annette Bösmeier

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Annette Bösmeier Designing an expert knowledge based approach for the quantification of historical floods – the case study of the Kinzig catchment in Southwest Germany


Elizabeth Peneycad

Elizabeth Peneycad

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Elizabeth Peneycad Coupling δ18O values of rodent tooth and mollusc shell carbonates: a new approach to reconstructing Pleistocene palaeotemperatures?


Janine Baijnath

Janine Baijnath

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Janine Baijnath Climatological Assessment of Spatiotemporal Trends in Observational Monthly Snowfall Totals and Extremes over the Canadian Great Lakes Basin


Johannes Winckler

Johannes Winckler

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Johannes Winckler The neglected nonlocal effects of deforestation


Katharina Höflich

Katharina Höflich

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Katharina Höflich Towards an improved mechanistic understanding of major saltwater inflows into the Baltic Sea

Latest posts from the CL blog

God does not play DICE – but Bill Nordhaus does! What can models tell us about the economics of climate change?

God does not play DICE – but Bill Nordhaus does! What can models tell us about the economics of climate change?

Climate change has been described as “the biggest market failure in human history”1. Although fuel is costly, emitting the by-product CO2 is for free; yet it causes damages to society. In other words, those who benefit, by using the atmosphere as waste dump, do not pay the full costs, i.e. the adverse effects climate change has on societies on a global scale. Can this market failure be cured? Should humankind sacrifice some of its present welfare to prevent future climate …


What can artificial intelligence do for climate science?

What can artificial intelligence do for climate science?

What is machine learning? Artificial Intelligence, and its subfield of machine learning, is a very trending topic as it plays an increasing role in our daily life. Examples are: translation programs, speech recognition software in mobile phones and automatic completion of search queries. However, what value do these new techniques have for climate science? And how complicated is it to use them? The idea behind machine learning is simple: a computer is not explicitly programmed to perform a particular task, …


How glowing sediment can help to decipher the Earth’s past climate !

How glowing sediment can help to decipher the Earth’s past climate !

The last 2.5 Million years of the Earth’s history (termed Quaternary) are characterised by climatic cycles oscillating between warm (interglacial) and cold (glacial) periods. To be able to fully understand and interpret past climate variations the development of accurate and precise chronological techniques is crucial. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a strong geochronological tool that can be used to date across a wide time range, from the modern days to a few hundred thousand years ago. It has been …


What can the Cretaceous tell us about our climate?

What can the Cretaceous tell us about our climate?

The Cretaceous The Cretaceous period features a particularly interesting climatic episode in the Earth’s geological history. It follows the Jurassic Period, better known as the time the dinosaurs inhabited Earth and spanned the period between 145.5 and 65.5 million years ago. The Cretaceous is the last period of the Mesozoic Era, which ends with a well-known mass extinction event. At the end of the Cretaceous, an asteroid hit the Earth in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, forming what is today called …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

This month, we have announced changes to the EGU General Assembly 2019 schedule, which aim to give more time for all presentation types. Check our news announcement for more information. If you’d like to apply for funding to attend the meeting next year, make sure to submit your conference abstract by 1 December! In other news, we have opened applications to the EGU General Assembly 2019 mentoring programme, and are advertising a job opportunity for geoscientists with science communication experience to work at the meeting.

Also this month, we opened the call for applications for EGU Public Engagement Grants, and have announced the creation of the EGU Working Group on Diversity and Equality. In addition, we opened the EGU Autumn 2018 Elections for the next EGU Treasurer: you have until 30 November to cast your vote. We’ll be announcing the results early next week.

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