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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Paul Tackley (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Jeroen van Hunen (jeroen.van-hunen@durham.ac.uk)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Anne Davaille

Anne Davaille

  • 2019
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2019 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Anne Davaille for innovative experiments and analysis in fluid mechanics, which have created a new understanding of convective regimes within the mantles of the Earth and other planets and of their magmatic systems.


Edgar M. Parmentier

Edgar M. Parmentier

  • 2018
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2018 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Edgar M. Parmentier for outstanding research in the fundamental geodynamical processes of sea-floor spreading, melt extraction and crustal formation, and the application of geodynamical principles to flow in the mantle.


Thibault Duretz

Thibault Duretz

  • 2018
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2018 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Thibault Duretz for his fundamental contributions to understanding slab detachment, shear zones, passive-margin formation, obduction and development of new numerical algorithms.


Antoniette G. Grima

Antoniette G. Grima

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Antoniette G. Grima Mid-Mantle Orphan Slabs


Roland Neofitu

Roland Neofitu

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Roland Neofitu Analysis of hiatal surfaces and the stratigraphic framework for the plume mode in the East African Rift System (EARS): Progress and Limitations

Latest posts from the GD blog

Happy blog birthday!

Happy blog birthday!

Can you believe it, people? We have been running this blog for 2 years! What a milestone! Time to celebrate and look back at a year of great blogging. Who are the champions? We are the champions, my friends! That’s right! We actually won a prize this year: we won best blog post of 2018 by public vote for a post by one of our editors, Luca Dal Zilio, about a conference he attended in Singapore. So we are now …


The Sassy Scientist – Time Trials

The Sassy Scientist – Time Trials

Every week, The Sassy Scientist answers a question on geodynamics, related topics, academic life, the universe or anything in between with a healthy dose of sarcasm. Do you have a question for The Sassy Scientist? Submit your question here. Sylvie asks: What would you say is the main problem you encountered during your research career? Dear Sylvie, Easy: time management and focus. Doing scientific research is hard enough without dealing with deadlines, waiting for collaborators to provide their contribution… — …


Production and Recycling of Archean Continental Crust

Production and Recycling of Archean Continental Crust

Continents are essential for the development and survival of life on Earth. However, as surprising as it may sound, there did not exist a planetary scale numerical model to show the formation of the oldest continents until this study. Here we present the first ever global simulations to feature the growth and destruction of continental crust. Fascinatingly, our results are in agreement with the present-day crustal volume estimates. Why do we care? Uniquely positioned within the habitable zone [1], Earth …


The Sassy Scientist – Research Relevance

The Sassy Scientist – Research Relevance

Every week, The Sassy Scientist answers a question on geodynamics, related topics, academic life, the universe or anything in between with a healthy dose of sarcasm. Do you have a question for The Sassy Scientist? Submit your question here. Meghan asks: Why is your research relevant? Dear Meghan, Because I like it. My supervisor is in my office every day to talk about my results. I talk to people outside my department and they say it all looks very promising. …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

The deadline to nominate the best deserving researchers for the EGU 2020 awards and medals is this month, on the 15th of June. To increase diversity in the group of EGU awardees and medallists, we encourage the EGU membership to consider gender, geographical and cultural balance when nominating outstanding Earth, planetary and space scientists at various career stages. We also remind you that the EGU launched two exciting new awards this year, which we are also accepting nominations for: the Angela Croome Award for science journalists and Katia and Maurice Krafft Award for researchers for excellence in science outreach and engagement.

Another important date to keep in mind is 9 June, the deadline for submitting your feedback on the EGU General Assembly 2019. This is your chance to help us improve the 2020 meeting.

If you are looking to organise a geoscience school or conference, keep an eye on egu.eu next week as we’ll be launching our call for applications for financial support from the EGU to organise topical events.